Will Palin win over Tarheel voters?

September 4, 2008 4:46:52 PM PDT
Vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin gave her first major prime time speech and had the Republican National Convention crowd rocking. But will it be enough to win over voters in the Tarheel State -- especially Hillary Clinton faithfuls?

ABC11's Tamara Gibbs sat down with Senator Elizabeth Dole and a republican turned democrat for the answer.

Senator Elizabeth Dole is skipping the RNC to stump for her own campaign, but she has a political newcomer, miles away in Minnesota, to thank for a renewed energy in the grand old party.

"I have heard has been great," Senator Dole said. "Everywhere I've been people have been saying I think it's great."

Talking to Chatham County leaders, Dole said she was pleasantly surprised governor Sarah Palin would join the ticket. Having met Palin, Dole is convinced she will deliver not only republican faithfuls, but also women and Hillary Clinton supporters.

"I think she'll have a broad appeal because she has the personality," the Senator said. "When you look back to when she served as mayor, this is when it's really face-to-face with people."

However, not everyone thinks McCain's VP pick will help win over voters in N.C. In fact, one registered republican in Pittsboro has already switched her ballot.

"There's no way I can vote for that woman," Pamela Cash-Roper said.

She is a die hard republican turned Barack Obama supporter who considers the Palin pick nothing more than a political ploy.

"I think it's a real slap in the face of women all over the United States to think that we would vote for a woman just because she was a woman," Cash-Roper said.

Before a crowd of 84,000, the Pittsboro native took center stage at the Democratic National Convention.

She admits the race to the Whit House will be tough.

But more so than gender and experience, Roper believes it will come down to something more.

"I voted my belief, but I also know we can't continue to be the big brother and sheriff of the world if we're not taking care of people at home," Cash-Roper said.


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