Vandalized brontosaurus repair begins

July 15, 2009 6:46:14 PM PDT
The Durham Museum of Life and Science has hired a North Carolina sculptor to repair and restore the headless brontosaurus. Greenville native Kenneth "Tripp" Jarvis will begin working on the project Wednesday.

The dinosaur sculpture, which is a long-time fixture at the museum, was vandalized in June and its head was stolen.

Durham police eventually located the missing head on a Durham County road but never publically identified any suspects in the crime for fear of retaliation against that person. However, police said they know who committed the vandalism and that person is paying restitution to the Museum.

Repairs will include reconstructing a 4-foot section between the body and the neck, attack the neck and head to the body, repair the mouth area and patch a hole in the body of the brontosaurus.

Jarvis has a master of fine art degree from East Carolina University and has over 15 years of experience in forming concrete over steel structures.

The Museum said it too community input into consideration as it made plans for the repair and restoration. At this time, there are no plans to relocate the sculpture.

Funds from restitution are paying for the repair, but community donations are needed for additional improvements.

The Museum said it has to raise about $4,600 to make those improvements. However, the improvements are underway.

Additional work can be completed and on-going services can be considered if the Museum raises another $10,000. That work includes fencing, painting, more restoration, security and maintenance.

So far, the Museum has received over $5,000 in donations to the Bronto Project.

To make a tax-deductible contribution to help repair the brontosaurus, make your check payable to Museum of Life and Science and note "Bronto" on the memo line.

Mail to: Museum of Life and Science, 433 Murray Avenue, Durham, NC 27704

To donate online, go to www.lifeandscience.org and go to "Donate and Support - Special Projects".

You can also call the Museum at 220-5429 and make a donation.


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