Jailhouse snitch takes stand in Domino's murder trial

Timmy Crandell
August 13, 2012 2:11:52 PM PDT
An inmate who describes himself as a professional snitch took the stand Monday in the trial of a man accused of murdering a Domino's Pizza manager.

Timmy Crandell took the stand in his Wake County Jail jumpsuit. He told jurors it was in the jail that he befriended Travis Sherman and essentially tricked him into becoming a jailhouse pen pal, looking for information in the murder of Kenny Ring.

Sherman is accused of murdering Ring in January of 2010. Ring was the manager of the Domino's Pizza in Knightdale when he was beaten to death and robbed while closing the store.

While on the stand, Crandell showed jurors some of the letters that were written in question and answer format, with the answers allegedly in Sherman's handwriting.

"He started askng me questions about his crime, how I felt about it.  I just gave him a little input and he just started writing letters, several letters pertaining to what he had did, how he did it,"Crandell said.

In one letter Crandell wrote, "Travis you was actually the one using the bat, right?" The answer, allegedly from Sherman, said "yea."

In another, Crandell said Sherman wrote, "Murder weapon got put in a dumpster, but they didn't find it then, and it's been like eight months since."

In other letters, it is allegedly Sherman who writes that he committed the crime while Ring was counting the money. The letter said about $1,000 was stolen and that he only got $200.

In one of the final letters, Sherman allegedly said, "The driver left on delivery. I was only one there. He came and picked me back up. He [Kenny Ring] was counting money in the back. It was already out."

During cross-examination Sherman's attorney attacked Crandell's credibility, but Crandell seemed proud of the fact that he has been a professional snitch for more than 20 years. He said he started his career in Nash County in 1990 and has been providing a service to the community by helping police ever since. Crandell told jurors he often gets paid for information that he turns over to police that helps get them criminal convictions.

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