Moral Monday event held in Fayetteville's Festival Park

The Moral Monday movement moved to Fayetteville where organizers called for more citizen involvement in government.
February 17, 2014 8:18:58 PM PST
The Moral Monday movement moved to Fayetteville where organizers called for more citizen involvement in the affairs of the government.

Four NAACP chapters from across the Sandhills gathered in Festival Park Monday evening to rally against the Republicans in power in Raleigh.

NAACP leaders say Monday's rally in Fayetteville was the first of several other on-the road Moral Monday demonstrations.

"We must be the trumpet of coconsciousness," North Carolina NAACP President Dr. William Barber told the crowd.

It sounded like part revival, and part rally. Barber used the occasion to give state lawmakers a tongue lashing.

"We are not dealing with Republicans," said Barber. "It's not about Republicans or Democrats. It's about extremist trying to hijack this state."

The crowd of 200 to 300 may have been small, but spirits were high. There were a lot of teachers and educators in the crowd, who are angry at state legislators.

"Taking away our funding, giving it to private schools, and then telling us we are doing a bad job," said teacher Danielle Steinhauser.

She and her 6-year-old son, added their voices to Monday's rally -- bringing attention to not only school funding, but other issues, including health care, unemployment and voting rights.

"Whoever heard of politicians that run to get elected, and then don't or won't listen to the people," said Barber.

People like Tony Spears, who owns a catering company in Fayetteville.

"I mean it's about everyone. We are all equal, whether you realize it or not," said Spears. "It's just a matter of time."

Other local NAACP members spoke at this rally, which Barber called part of a moral movement that won't be silenced.

"We are now back on the road," said Barber. "Fayetteville is our first stop, and this train isn't going to stop anytime soon."

Barber challenged the crowd to find 10-15 unregistered voters, and get them signed up for this year's elections.

The NAACP hasn't said yet where the next on the road rally will be.

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