NCDHHS reveals its 2022 Monkeypox response plan

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Tuesday, August 9, 2022 2:49PM
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The North Carolina Department of Health and Human services released its 2022 plan in the event of a Monkeypox outbreak.

RALEIGH, N.C. (WTVD) -- The North Carolina Department of Health and Human services released its 2022 plan in the event of a Monkeypox outbreak.

The four-page plan shows how the state would respond and provides details for those impacted. It also serves as an education tool for North Carolinians.

"We have been monitoring the Monkeypox outbreak and planning our response even before the first cases were reported in North Carolina," said NCDHHS Secretary Kody H. Kinsley. "Releasing this plan helps all North Carolinians, including caregivers across our health system and individuals, to be on the same page about what they can do to control the spread of monkeypox."

Here are key points that DHHS said all North Carolinians need to know should an outbreak occur:

  • First, get checked. If you've had close contact - including sex - with someone with monkeypox, see a health care provider. If you have bumps, sores or a rash that looks like blisters or pimples, see a health care provider. Call your local health department if you don't have a provider.
  • Second, get tested. Testing is widely available and encouraged if you have symptoms of monkeypox. Samples must be collected by a health care professional, and they must follow a specific procedure to collect a good sample for testing. NCDHHS recommends providers test any patient with a suspicious lesion or sore.
  • Third, get protected. Most people with monkey pox infection get better on their own. Treatment is available and may be recommended for people with a high risk of severe illness. Vaccines are available for those exposed to monkeypox. Gay or bisexual men or transgender individuals who had multiple sex partners or anonymous sex in the last 14 days are also eligible for a vaccine. Supplies are limited, but more are coming. Contact your local health department for more information. Vaccine must be given within 14 days of exposure.