Reverend William Barber announces return of Moral Monday demonstrations for legislative short session

Protestors with the "Moral Monday Movement" returned as the General Assembly reconvened Wednesday.
May 14, 2014 12:57:03 PM PDT
Protesters with the "Moral Monday Movement" returned as the General Assembly reconvened Wednesday.

Those Moral Monday protests against the Republican legislature made national headlines, but organizers say they also made lawmakers and Governor Pat McCrory take notice.

"You know the governor wouldn't be talking about shifting in Medicaid, even a little bit if it wasn't for this movement. He wouldn't be taking about window dressing, paying the teachers, if it wasn't for this movement," said North Carolina NAACP President Rev. William Barber.

Barber announced the return of those demonstrations for the short session Wednesday. He introduced people who say they are suffering from laws and policies championed by conservatives.

"My husband could not afford to go to the doctor because we fell into that Medicaid gap," said Moral Monday supporter Pattie Meegan.

Meegan says her husband has prostate cancer, and his treatment costs more than a $1 million.

"What exactly did [Governor Pat McCrory] save this state? Not to mention, my husband would not be at stage 4 cancer. That is the most curable cancer. What did [McCrory] save this state," Meegan said.

Barber, who was arrested during the first Moral Monday protests, says they will do everything a judge allows to make their point this time.



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