Names released of all 11 victims of Pittsburgh synagogue shooting

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Names released of all 11 victims of synagogue shooting. Watch the report from ABC News' Maggie Rulli on October 28, 2018.

Officials released the names of all 11 victims during a news conference Sunday, all of them middle-aged or elderly. The victims included a pair of brothers and a husband and wife. The oldest was 97.

-Joyce Fienberg, 75, of Oakland, City of Pittsburgh

-Richard Gottfried, 65, of Ross Township
-Rose Mallinger, 97, of Squirrel Hill, City of Pittsburgh
-Jerry Rabinowitz, 66, of Edgewood Borough
-Cecil Rosenthal, 59, of Squirrel Hill, City of Pittsburgh
-David Rosenthal, 54, (brother of Cecil), of Squirrel Hill
-Bernice Simon, 84, of Wilkinsburg
-Sylvan Simon, 86, (husband of Bernice), of Wilkinsburg
-Daniel Stein, 71, of Squirrel Hill, City of Pittsburgh
-Melvin Wax, 88, of Squirrel Hill, City of Pittsburgh
-Irving Younger, 69, of Mt. Washington, City of Pittsburgh

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The suspect in the mass shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue expressed hatred of Jews during the rampage and told officers afterward that Jews were committing genocide and he wanted them all to die, according to charging documents made public Sunday.

Robert Gregory Bowers killed eight men and three women inside the Tree of Life Synagogue on Saturday during worship services before a tactical police team tracked him down and shot him, police said in an affidavit, which contained some unreported details on the shooting and the police response.
RELATED: Robert Bowers identified as Pittsburgh synagogue shooting suspect: What we know
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Local, state and federal officials hold a news conference on the Pittsburgh synagogue shooting on October 27, 2018.



Mayor Bill Peduto called it the "darkest day of Pittsburgh's history."

Calls began coming in to 911 from the synagogue just before 10 a.m. Saturday, reporting "they were being attacked," court documents said. Bowers, 46, shot one of the first two officers to respond in the hand, and the other was wounded by "shrapnel and broken glass."

A tactical team found Bowers on the third floor, where he shot two officers multiple times, the affidavit said. One officer was described as critically wounded; the document did not describe the other officer's condition.

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FBI special agent Bob Jones discusses the investigation into Pittsburgh synagogue shooting suspect Robert Bowers.


Two other people in the synagogue, a man and a woman, were wounded by Bowers and were in stable condition, the document said.

Bowers, who was armed with an AR-15 rifle and three handguns, told an officer while he was being treated for his injuries "that he wanted all Jews to die and also that they (Jews) were committing genocide to his people," the affidavit said.

Bowers was charged late Saturday with 11 state counts of criminal homicide, six counts of aggravated assault and 13 counts of ethnic intimidation in what the leader of the Anti-Defamation League called the deadliest attack on Jews in U.S. history.

RELATED: Security increased at local synagogues following Pittsburgh synagogue shooting

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Chopper video from scene of Pittsburgh synagogue shooting on October 27, 2018



Bowers was also charged Saturday in a 29-count federal criminal complaint that included charges of obstructing the free exercise of religious beliefs - a federal hate crime - and using a firearm to commit murder. U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions said the charges "could lead to the death penalty."

It wasn't clear whether Bowers had an attorney to speak on his behalf.

The nation's latest mass shooting drew condemnation and expressions of sympathy from politicians and religious leaders of all stripes. With the midterm election just over a week away, it also reignited a longstanding and bitter debate over guns.
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Governor Tom Wolf and Pittsburgh officials hold a news conference after a shooting at a synagogue on October 27, 2018.



Pope Francis led prayers for Pittsburgh on Sunday in St. Peter's Square.

"In reality, all of us are wounded by this inhuman act of violence," he said. He prayed for God "to help us to extinguish the flames of hatred that develop in our societies, reinforcing the sense of humanity, respect for life and civil and moral values."

German Chancellor Angela Merkel's spokesman quoted Merkel on Twitter as offering her condolences and saying that "all of us must confront anti-Semitism with determination - everywhere."

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Rabbi Benjamin Sendrow offers a prayer for the Pittsburgh synagogue shooting victims during a Trump event in Indiana on October 27, 2018.



German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier wrote in a condolence message to President Donald Trump that "this abhorrent crime reminds us all to do what is in our power to advocate against hatred and violence, against anti-Semitism and exclusion, and to counter with determination those who incite them."

Trump on Saturday said the outcome might have been different if the synagogue "had some kind of protection" from an armed guard, while Pennsylvania's Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf, up for re-election, noted that once again "dangerous weapons are putting our citizens in harm's way."

Calling the shooting an "evil anti-Semitic attack," Trump ordered flags at federal buildings throughout the U.S. to be flown at half-staff in respect for the victims. He said he planned to travel to Pittsburgh, but offered no details.

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President Donald Trump is responding to what he's calling the "devastating" shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue, saying: "It's a terrible thing what's going on with hate in our country."

FULL PITTSBURGH SYNAGOGUE SHOOTING COVERAGE:



Information from The Associated Press was used in this post.
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