Fayetteville holds ongoing info session about major bond package for city improvements

ByMonique John via WTVD logo
Wednesday, September 21, 2022 11:19PM
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Fayetteville city leaders are pounding the pavement to field questions from residents about its major bond package proposal in a series of info sessions at recreation centers throughout the city.

FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. (WTVD) -- Fayetteville city leaders are pounding the pavement to field questions from residents about its major bond package proposal in a series of information sessions at recreation centers throughout the city.

Residents get to vote on the package that officials plan on using to transform the city in November.

"The city is pursuing projects that affect all districts and all neighborhoods. There is something in this bond package for everyone that will touch every single resident, every single district," said Jodi Phelps, City of Fayetteville Chief of Staff.

Officials say the package would borrow up to $97 million in bonds to fund projects enhancing the city. Implementing the package would mean that homeowners with average values of about $200,000 would pay about $80 a year. However, officials argue it's worth the investment.

The money would be poured into public safety, infrastructure, and bringing more affordable housing. Items that residents have said need to be prioritized for years.

"All three of these bonds questions that are going to be on the ballot, they tie together in a really unique way," Phelps said." They all address the safety and security of residents. They improve our quality of life and they will help drive the sort of economic growth across the city."

Phelps also says that even projects that aren't allocated bond funding could be moved up in the pipeline because of it. That's because the money would help projects move forward overall--especially for infrastructure.

"Whether or not they are addressed with this bond funding, what it does is it accelerates our ability and it expedites our ability to get to the entire project--particularly for sidewalks or streets. Where we might not be able to get to a street on the plan for five years, this might move that up a couple years," Phelps said.

The city says it will go back to the drawing board to devise another financial proposal if the bond gets voted down. However, that also means big projects may have to wait. Residents can learn more about the upcoming information sessions about the bond package on the city's website here.