Detective: Inconsistencies in Cooper statements

Detective George Daniels
April 15, 2011 3:28:38 PM PDT
Cary's lead detective in the Nancy Cooper murder investigation took the stand in the murder trial against her husband Brad Cooper on Friday.At the beginning of the trial Brad Cooper's attorney told jurors that while Cooper was innocent he made some mis-statements to police.

On Friday, Cary Police Detective George Daniels pointed out specific inconsistencies to jurors.

In July 2008, Brad Cooper answered investigators questions in person when his wife was missing. But after her body was found not far from their Cary home in an unfinished subdivision, he was asked to answer the questions a second time.

So, Cooper's attorneys sent a letter to police with answers to 14 specific questions.

He again answered many of the same questions during a taped child custody deposition in October of 2008 - this time from Nancy Cooper's divorce attorney.

"Have you ever seen any other e-mails that I sent to Nancy?" asked attorney Alice Stubbs in a October 2008 deposition.

"To the best of knowledge, no," replied Brad Cooper in the October 2008 deposition.

Detective Daniels, after that video clip played in the courtroom, said Cooper had lied - that he had read e-mails to his wife from her attorney.

"He tapped into her e-mails to view it we later found out," Daniels said. "And that's why it stuck out to me when he said he hadn't viewed them where, in fact, he had viewed them prior to Nancy viewing them."

Other testimony showed that Cooper, a computer engineer, had devised a way to have all Nancy Cooper's e-mail forwarded to him.

The prosecution continued playing clip after clip of the deposition and having the detective point out inconsistencies with other statements or evidence police had uncovered.

Before the detective resumed his testimony, the judge told the attorneys the jury wanted to know how much longer the trial would last.

A prosecutor told the judge their case might be wrapped up Friday, while a defense attorney said their case shouldn't be longer than two weeks.

But the judge would not be specific with jurors only telling them that they were trying to minimize their time away from family and work.

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