'He was the center of our family'

October 19, 2009 9:00:00 PM PDT
Fay Brown is the only woman in a group of 20 inmates set to released after a controversial ruling by North Carolina's Supreme Court. All are either convicted murderers or rapists, and there's been a public outcry after the decision.The court interprets a 1980's law to mean that life in prison equals 80 years. Brown and others say that with time off for good behavior and other reductions - they've paid their debt to society.

Brown was convicted in the Martin County killing of State Trooper Guy Davis 34 years ago. Brown and two accomplices held up a bank in Jamesville, North Carolina in September 1975. After the robbery, the trio made a quick getaway.

Trooper Davis saw them blow through a stop light and pulled them over. It's believed he approached the driver's side of the car thinking he was making a routine traffic stop. That is until the blast from a sawed-off shotgun pierced his throat. Brown's accomplice Joseph Seeborn, pulled the trigger.

"I have remorse for my crime. I didn't want that to happen, said Brown in an interview with WE television.

To this day, Brown maintains she's innocent of killing Davis.

"You know, I never meant for anybody to be hurt, no, never," she said.

But Brown's remorse is no comfort for Davis' son Tommy, and her pending release frustrates him.

"She was laying down at the foot of the car on the right hand side. And if she didn't want anybody to get harmed then she had the opportunity to raise up and say something," he offered.

Davis was 20 and his brother 18 when they learned their father was murdered in the line of duty.

"He was the center of our family," said Tommy Davis. "My mom was left without her husband. He was a very loving man. He was loved by everybody in the community."

Brown says while she's sorry for what happened, she didn't kill anyone.

"I made a bad choice. I made a bad choice by being there," Brown told WE. "I bear some responsibility for his death, but not directly."

Davis clearly remembers what happened after the shooting.

"The situation after my dad was shot and killed, they fled and ran and went and hid in a soybean field. And at that time, I remember the manhunt, the helicopter that came down and they were captured. They were sentenced to the death penalty.

But the death sentence was never carried out.

"While I was on death row, the higher court ruled the death penalty was unconstitutional," Brown recalled.

"I was disappointed when they struck down the death penalty. She got a second chance and now she has life in prison," said Davis "And just last week we find out life in prison is not life in prison. After 30 years, she's going to be a free person."

The decision angers Tommy Davis, but Brown says it's fair.

"I have remorse, but I don't feel like I should pay for it for the rest of my life," she said.

"We've lived our whole life without him and he didn't have a choice. She did have a choice" Davis countered.

34 years after the killing, Brown has a message for the Davis family.

"I'd like to say to the family of Guy Thomas Davis that I am truly sorry for your loss," she said. "And I hope that someday that they will forgive me."

Tommy Davis isn't interested.

"I don't have any desire to speak to her," he said. "I'm frustrated at the way the legal system has allowed this to happen. She's actually gotten a third chance. My dad didn't have a second chance."

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