How will Roe v. Wade ruling impact communities of color? NC residents, organizations divided

Akilah Davis Image
Sunday, June 26, 2022
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NC State health officials report 30,004 abortions in 2020. The data shows the abortion rate across North Carolina by the demographics for females between the ages of 15 and 44.

RALEIGH, N.C. (WTVD) -- Over the years sisters Allison Chunko and Kelly Flis have disagreed on many things. That includes the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade. It's been the topic of discussion at Chavis Park Friday afternoon.

"Women should have a choice," said Kelly Flis. "If a woman is raped how do people not believe they should have a right to choose? It should be in the state they live. They should not have to travel someplace else."

It's a hot-button issue for many. Flis' sister Chunko had her own thoughts.

"I'm fighting for the unborn baby," said Chunko. " I think even if a woman has a baby, there's adoption. so many families that want kids."

State health officials report 30,004 abortions in 2020. The data shows the abortion rate across North Carolina by the demographics for females between the ages of 15 and 44.

According to the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, Black women top the list at 12,345 abortions. White women make up 6,999 abortions. Hispanic women make up 3,287 abortions. Non-Hispanic women make up 820 abortions. American Indian women make up 273 abortions.

The CDC says Black and Hispanic women have the highest abortion rates in the country.

"We're here in 2022 having this conversation about women who are going to be further harmed. Women who are put in a situation where they're having children they can't provide for," said Corine Mack, North Carolina NAACP fourth vice president.

She says this ruling has socioeconomic effects with many factors as to why a person of color may want an abortion.

"You can't tell me you're pro-life when you don't think about all those lives that will be brought in his world who will not have provisions," she said.

According to Mack, forced pregnancy has serious consequences. It leaves women in trigger states traveling up and down the I-95 corridor .

"Women will die. Some women will attempt to get abortions anyway in those dark alleys like they did in the 70's," said Mack.

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