Abortion restriction bill passes NC Senate 1-day after passing NC House, Gov. Cooper plans to veto

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Friday, May 5, 2023
NC abortion restriction bill passes, Cooper vows veto
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North Carolina lawmakers on Thursday approved a ban on nearly all abortions after 12 weeks of pregnancy.

RALEIGH, N.C. (WTVD) -- North Carolina lawmakers on Thursday approved a ban on nearly all abortions after 12 weeks of pregnancy, down from the current 20 weeks, in response to last year's overturning of Roe v. Wade at the U.S. Supreme Court.

The ban is one of the least onerous of a slew of bills Republican-led assemblies have pushed through in recent months since the high court stripped away women's constitutional protections for abortion. Other states have banned the procedure nearly completely or throughout pregnancy.

Below: Read the bill for yourself

While perhaps less restrictive, North Carolina's bill has far-reaching consequences. Before its passage, many women from nearby states with restrictive laws had traveled to the state for abortions in later stages of pregnancy.

Abortion-rights supporter Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper has pledged to veto the bill, calling it "an egregious, unacceptable attack on the women of our state," but GOP seat margins and assurances from chamber leaders indicate a veto will likely be overridden.

By a 29-20 vote, the Senate completed legislative passage of the bill Thursday afternoon after the House passed the measure Wednesday night on a similar party-line vote. Democrats unsuccessfully attempted several parliamentary maneuvers to get the measure sent back to committee during an hours long debate. Senate Minority Leader Dan Blue of Wake County said this was the first time all 20 members of the chamber's Democratic caucus spoke on the floor about a single bill. He called the abortion vote "one of the most consequential things we have done in this chamber."

State law currently bans almost all abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy. Starting July 1, the ban would be reduced to 12 weeks. It also places limits on new exceptions, capping abortions at 20 weeks in cases of rape or incest and 24 weeks for "life-limiting" fetal anomalies, including certain physical or genetic disorders that can be diagnosed prenatally. An existing exception for when the life of the pregnant woman is in danger would remain.

The 46-page bill, which was revealed just this week after months of private negotiations by Republican legislators, also includes more medical and paperwork requirements for pregnant women and physicians and licensing requirements for abortion clinics.

GOP lawmakers also are promoting at least $160 million for such services as maternal health, adoption care, contraceptive services and paid leave for teachers and state employees after the birth of a child.

Sen. Joyce Krawiec, a Forsyth County Republican who helped negotiate the measure, said during Thursday's debate that "many of us who have worked for decades to save unborn babies for the sanctity of human life, we saw it as an opportunity to put forth a very pro-life, pro-woman legislation."

"This is a pro-life plan, not an abortion ban," Krawiec added.

Cooper and other critics of the bill say the measure remains an attack on reproductive freedoms and denies women the ability to make their own health care choices by adding obstacles to abortions that would remain legal.

"This bill is an extreme and oppressive step backwards for our society and one that will deny women the right to make decisions about their own health care and future," Democratic Sen. Sydney Batch of Wake County said during the debate.

Batch and others cite in part the requirement for women to make an in-person visit to a medical professional at least 72 hours before getting an abortion. Under current law, the three-day waiting period can be initiated over the phone. The bill would also require a doctor to schedule a follow-up visit for women who have a medically induced abortion, increasing the hardship for those who travel to North Carolina from out of state.

Republicans have been more aggressive in advancing measures that Cooper has opposed or otherwise vetoed after GOP seat gains during the November elections. The party got veto-proof majorities in both chambers last month, when then-Democratic Rep. Tricia Cotham switched to the Republican Party. Cotham, who had spoken out previously for abortion rights but had expressed a willingness to consider additional restrictions, voted for the bill Wednesday night.

The measure contains other restrictions that Cooper had successfully vetoed in previous years. One would bar women from getting abortions on the basis of race or a prenatal diagnosis of Down syndrome. Another would require doctors and nurses to protect and care for children born alive during a failed abortion later in pregnancy.

Still, North Carolina Republicans stung by some 2022 electoral defeats in suburban legislative and congressional districts where abortion was an issue ultimately declined to push more stringent prohibitions as other states have done.

Meanwhile, at least 19 Democratic-dominated states have taken steps - through a law, constitutional amendment or executive order - to protect access to abortion.

Last year, Cooper signed an executive order shielding out-of-state abortion patients from extradition and prohibiting state agencies under his control from assisting other states' prosecutions of those who travel for the procedure.

Most of the states where the status quo remains are those where the political leadership is divided between the two parties.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

REACTIONS

Abortion rights advocates said the impacts of the new legislation could be far reaching and long lasting.

"Black women already have to be the mom, be the dad, be the grandma, be the aunt, be the uncle and be everything else. And now we have to advocate for something that is none of your business in the first place," Carrol Olinger said.

Olinger is the Vice President of the National Organization for Women. She has lived in Downtown Fayetteville for nearly 30 years, and said black women will bear the brunt of this ban.

The latest data from the CDC shows black women account for almost 52 percent of abortions in North Carolina compared to about 28 percent of white women and 13 percent of Hispanic women.

"It seems like we're invisible. Even though the louder we are we seem like we're mad black women. They're not looking at what we're saying. Let us make these decisions for me, you can't make that choice for me.," she said.

National numbers also show about half of pregnancies in in the United States are unintended, occurring most frequently among young women, minorities, and women with low income.

Dr. Beverly Gray is a OBGYN with Duke Health, and says the legislation creates more barriers for women who are seeking reproductive health care by requiring three in-person visits instead of the current requirement of one.

"Patients living in poverty are disproportionately impacted by bans and by legislation affecting abortion care. So those folks don't have insurance coverage. They may already live in a place where it's a maternity care desert. So it's hard to seek care in general, especially in the rural communities of our state," Gray said.