Vote 2022: Baldwin fends off spirited challenge to win 2nd term as Raleigh mayor

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Wednesday, November 9, 2022
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Incumbent Raleigh Mayor Mary-Ann Baldwin fended off two challengers to win another term.

RALEIGH, N.C. (WTVD) -- Raleigh Mayor Mary-Ann Baldwin won re-election Tuesday night, earning a second term in office.

Baldwin, who replaced former Mayor Nancy McFarlane in 2019, fended off challenges from NC State Professor Dr. Terrance Ruth and DaQaunta Copeland, who is Vice Chair of the Wake County Health and Human Services Board.

While Baldwin won just 38% of the vote in a divided field during her initial run, she won far more easily this go-around facing just two candidates.

During her tenure, Baldwin, alongside other City Council members, have focused on affordable housing, including the controversial Missing Middle rezoning policy, as well as economic recovery stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic. The recently-enacted Sip n' Stroll program has largely earned positive feedback, with other cities across the state planning to implement similar policies.

Last summer, Baldwin faced an ultimately unsuccessful recall bid, as a group of residents expressed frustration about the decision to delay the elections a full year because of the 2020 census results; more than 30 municipalities in the state also delayed their respective elections.

Prior to serving as mayor, Baldwin served on City Council for a decade, was CEO of Holt Brothers Inc., and founded Baldwin Communications, a consulting firm.

Housing affordability was a major factor in the mayoral race.

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Earlier Tuesday, ABC11 spoke with residents about the struggle to purchase homes and the expectation they have of the mayor to tackle this problem.

"I think the only way you can find good housing nowadays is leaving Raleigh and going to the outsides," said Sultan Gourche.

Nevaeh Brooks added: "People who have minimum-wage jobs, they're not targeting them."

Baldwin has said that affordable housing is one of her top priorities.

"I'm fortunate that I can afford some of this housing around here, but it's nothing like what future generations can afford," said Raleigh resident Daniel Harris.

On the city council, seven candidates were vying for two at-large seats.