Hairston SUV renter's numerous receipts uncovered

PJ Hairston (Photo courtesy of UNC)
July 11, 2013 3:21:21 PM PDT
ABC11 has uncovered new details about luxury cars linked to the man at the center of the latest UNC scandal.

Haydn "Fats" Thomas rented the car that P.J. Hairston was in when he was arrested.

Thomas denied renting vehicles for athletes, but he admits he often rents cars. From February to June, he rented 14 cars from Hertz, totaling nearly $17,000, according to receipts obtained by ABC11.

At least four of those 14 cars were ticketed on UNC's campus, including a Camaro that Hairston was cited in for speeding in May.

It is unclear if this warrants an NCAA investigation. Thomas said he has yet to be contacted by NCAA investigators.

UNC said it is still gathering all of the facts before it makes a statement.

On Wednesday, Durham police said they will be not be seeking any more charges related to the night Hairston and his two passengers were arrested for marijuana possession. Hairston was also charged with driving without a license.

A former attorney said the Durham Police Department's decision not to pursue charges related to a gun found during the traffic stop, could mean the gun's owner is still a mystery.

"From a defense point of view, if nobody saw them throw it out it could've been thrown out of any other car that had gone through that checkpoint and somebody didn't want to get caught with a gun," former attorney Karl Knudsen said.

The marijuana charges could ultimately be thrown out if the suspects do not have a serious criminal record and they agree to community service or a drug class.

"I've seen it happen many times, marijuana is found in the car, multiple occupants in the car, nobody claims it. The thing you usually do is charge everybody," Knudsen said. "Just because you're driving a car and there's something found in the car doesn't necessarily mean that you're found in constructive possession of it. You have to know it."

There are two ways to be charged with possession -- constructive or actual.

"If you're riding in my car and you have a bag of weed in your pocket, and I know that you have it in your pocket and I allow you to ride in my car then you are actual possession of that marijuana. I'm in constructive possession because I allowed it to be present in the vehicle that i'm under control of," Knudsen said.

ABC11 requested interviews with UNC officials, but the request was denied.

Several calls have also been made to Hairston's attorney, but ABC11 has not received a response.

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